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Leg Pain

thigh pain

Leg pain is more common in the outer thigh.

There are two cases of lateral thigh pain, one is lateral femoral cutaneous neuritis, and the other is lateral femoral cutaneous nerve compression syndrome.

Lateral femoral cutaneous neuritis is also called paresthesia femoral pain. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is sent from the second to third lumbar nerves, passing through the lateral edge of the psoas muscle, obliquely across the iliac muscle, and along the deep surface of the pelvis through the inguinal ligament, in the iliac Pass the fascia lata to the skin of the thigh 10 cm below the anterior superior spine.

In the course of this nerve, if the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is affected by some reasons such as compression, trauma, etc., lateral femoral cutaneous neuritis may occur.

It is more common in obese young and middle-aged men. Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve compression syndrome refers to nerve dysfunction caused by compression of certain pressure factors at the location of the nerve.


Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve compression syndrome:

  1. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is angled at the pelvis and thigh, and anatomical variations. When the limbs are moved or the position is improper, the nerve is continuously stretched, rubbed, squeezed, etc., causing local tissue edema, scar formation, and muscle tendons The membrane sheath thickens, causing nerve entrapment.
  2. Pelvic fractures, tumours, foreign bodies, plaster compress the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, causing compression.
  3. The nerve is stimulated when the iliac bone is surgically cut, or the nerve is compressed by local scar adhesion.
  4. Intrafascial hematoma of the iliopsoas muscle in patients with trauma or hemophilia can cause intrinsic symptoms.
     

 

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Newtown Accupuncture and Chinese Medical Centre

(02) 8084 0234
0416 453 948
15 Gowrie St, Newtown NSW 2042
*We are located within 6 minutes walk from both Newtown and Erskineville train station. Walk-in's welcome. Parking available.
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